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Air Quality Assessors Blog


Combat Seasonal Allergies
Combat Seasonal Allergies


Spring is in the air! Unfortunately, that doesn't bring warm and fuzzy feelings to everybody. If you're someone who suffers from allergies in the spring time, you know how these conflicting emotions come into play. We're here with some information on why this happens and how to lessen the impact this spring.


Causes Of Allergy Symptoms

What causes allergy symptoms to rise in the spring, anyway? The most common trigger for these symptoms is the rise of pollen in the air. If you weren't aware, plants in the environment release these small particles into the air to fertilize other plants. When someone is allergic to pollen, breathing it in triggers the release of histamines in the body to protect against the perceived attack to the immune system. This is precisely what gives you those annoying common allergy symptoms such as sniffling, rash, sneezing, eye and throat irritation.


Indoor/Outdoor Air Quality 

Did you know that indoor and outdoor air quality have an effect on the severity of allergy symptoms? For example, there are other factors that have a negative impact on outdoor air quality such as smoke, emissions, dust, and ozone in the atmosphere. When these combine with high pollen, you're looking at a pretty miserable time for allergy sufferers. This is why you see an increased rate of allergy sufferers in busy city environments with high pollution. It's important for allergy sufferers to reduce their exposure to pollutants, particularly indoors. Since there isn't as much circulation indoors as there is outdoors, improving your indoor air quality should be a top priority if you suffer from allergies.


Where Mold Comes In

Mold can also be a cause for allergies. The respiratory irritation that we associate with spring time allergies is another symptom of mold exposure. If there is increased humidity and insufficient circulation of air in your house, it's a good idea to diligently check for mold. It thrives in damp conditions that come with the spring time. There are other possible causes for an increase in symptoms, too. Dust mites are another common indoor allergen that can cause trouble for allergy sufferers!


How To Tackle Your Symptoms

You don't have to continue suffering through allergy season every year! We all know to keep the windows closed when those high pollen days roll around, but there are also different treatments and ways to prevent it from becoming too intense. Be sure to keep an eye on the pollen count with your favorite weather channel so you're never taken by surprise. Spring cleaning is another way you can tackle indoor allergens head on! Be sure to clean from top to bottom to ensure you're getting all the allergens and dust that escape from surfaces as you're cleaning. Be sure to replace the filters on your furnace, air conditioners, and air purifiers if you have them. It's also a good idea to team up with a local air quality assessor, like AQA, to ensure that you're doing all you can to keep your house free of indoor allergens.


Pollen Allergens | Indoor Air Quality
Pollen Allergens | Indoor Air Quality

 

 

Every year, millions of allergy sufferers are affected by pollen.  Pollen is a powdery yellow substance found on plants to help them reproduce.  In some cases, plants can fertilize themselves, but other plants rely on cross-pollination. As insects, birds, and the wind carry pollen between plants, some of the tiny particles inevitably drop. The pollen particles are then available to enter our nose, eyes, and throat, triggering varying allergies.  Pollen can travel hundreds of miles, so attempting to rid your yard of the offending plants will not help.  Ragweed, a common plant affecting many allergy sufferers, can produce over one million grains of pollen per day.  Fighting the allergenic pollen can seem like an insurmountable task.  Pollen is here to stay, but there are tips and tricks to help you cope. 

 

            Pollen allergies can last throughout the entire year, as several plants pollinate year-round.  The pollen count is dependent upon your location, and the duration of the season.  Pollen from trees is released during the spring, grass pollen is released during the summer, and weed pollen circulates during the fall.  Tens of millions of Americans are affected by pollen allergies every year and suffer from sneezing, nasal congestion, running nose, coughing, headaches, itchy and watery eyes, and wheezing, a lot of which can occur in your home. Indoor allergen levels can determine how impacted allergy sufferers will be indoors whether it be due to raised levels of pollen, mold, or chemicals. Pollen allergies can also exacerbate symptoms with asthma suffers indoors and outdoors.

 

            Loose pollen in the air can attach on skin, clothing, shoes, hair, and pets.  Once pollen enters your home it can cling to carpet fibers and furniture, and recirculate as you move around your home.  Attempting to keep pollen out of your home is challenging, but not impossible.  There are a few preemptive measures you can take to help make your home a no-pollen zone.  First, you want to keep your car in the garage.  If you do not have a garage, consider hosing down your car frequently.  Pollen can stick to your car, door handles, and windows, and spread easily anytime you touch the car or lower a window.  Next, check your shoes at the door.  Always wipe your feet, and then leave shoes and outerwear at the entry way or mud room.  Purify yourself – especially if you’ve been working outside.  Immediately throw clothing in the washing machine to prevent tracking the pollen throughout your house.  You also want to shower immediately, and always wash your hair before going to bed to prevent pollen-contaminated pillows and bedding.  Next, you want to make sure your indoor-outdoor pets are wiped down and brushed before returning indoors.  Another way to limit the pollen count from entering your home is to dust and vacuum frequently.  If you have a bagless vacuum, always empty contents in a bag outside.  Another tactic is to keep the windows and doors shut.  While it can be tempting to let in fresh air, pollen also enters the home and contaminates all that fresh air you crave.  Always remember to change HEPA and HVAC filters monthly, to ensure well-maintained units and clean sinuses.  Lastly, limit your time on the porch during high pollen count times.  When the pollen is low, or pollen season is over, clean your porch furniture and hose down the floor and screens. 

 

 To review, here are our best tips for keeping pollen out of your home:

▪   Keep your car in the garage

▪   Check your shoes at the door

▪   Shower and wash clothes after outdoor activities

▪   Bathe your indoor-outdoor pets

▪   Vacuum and dust frequently

▪   Clean outdoor furniture after pollen season

 

            If pollen has already entered your home, you are not out of luck.  You can still remove the pollen from your space with a few easy housekeeping measures.  Make sure to frequently wipe down surfaces with a damp microfiber cloth to trap the particles.  Thoroughly clean all surfaces and ceiling fans, and follow with vacuuming and mopping.  Be sure to use the suction attachment to clean upholstery, and navigate the corners and crevices in your home.  You will also want to wash all bedding in warm water.  Bathe and brush pets, and clean their paws as well.  Change all air filters once per month, and use vent filters for room vents to help trap pollen in the air ducts.

 

            There are many affordable products on the market today that can help improve the air quality in your home and trap the offending pollen particles.  HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) filters are designed to prevent 99% of pollen from entering the home.  HEPA filters help to clean the indoor air and prevent allergens from circulating.  HEPA filters are used in many air filters, air purifiers, and vacuum cleaners.  When used in conjunction with a well-maintained HVAC system, HEPA filters can drastically improve the air quality of your home. Air Quality Assessors can determine allergen levels in your home and offer advice to help you get through this allergy season.  We are licensed and certified professionals, with 30 years of experience in maintaining high indoor environmental quality.  Call today to schedule an assessment of your indoor air quality, and let us help keep you and your family protected this allergy season.

 

 



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Every year, millions of allergy sufferers are affected by pollen.  Pollen is a powdery yellow substance found on plants to help them reproduce.  In some cases, plants can fertilize themselves, but other plants rely on cross-pollination. As insects, birds, and the wind carry pollen between plants, some of the tiny particles inevitably drop. The pollen particles are then available to enter our nose, eyes, and throat, triggering varying allergies.  Pollen can travel hundreds of miles, so attempting to rid your yard of the offending plants will not help.  Ragweed, a common plant affecting many allergy sufferers, can produce over one million grains of pollen per day.  Fighting the allergenic pollen can seem like an insurmountable task.  Pollen is here to stay, but there are tips and tricks to help you cope. 

 

            Pollen allergies can last throughout the entire year, as several plants pollinate year-round.  The pollen count is dependent upon your location, and the duration of the season.  Pollen from trees is released during the spring, grass pollen is released during the summer, and weed pollen circulates during the fall.  Tens of millions of Americans are affected by pollen allergies every year and suffer from sneezing, nasal congestion, running nose, coughing, headaches, itchy and watery eyes, and wheezing, a lot of which can occur in your home. Indoor allergen levels can determine how impacted allergy sufferers will be indoors whether it be due to raised levels of pollen, mold, or chemicals. Pollen allergies can also exacerbate symptoms with asthma suffers indoors and outdoors.

 

            Loose pollen in the air can attach on skin, clothing, shoes, hair, and pets.  Once pollen enters your home it can cling to carpet fibers and furniture, and recirculate as you move around your home.  Attempting to keep pollen out of your home is challenging, but not impossible.  There are a few preemptive measures you can take to help make your home a no-pollen zone.  First, you want to keep your car in the garage.  If you do not have a garage, consider hosing down your car frequently.  Pollen can stick to your car, door handles, and windows, and spread easily anytime you touch the car or lower a window.  Next, check your shoes at the door.  Always wipe your feet, and then leave shoes and outerwear at the entry way or mud room.  Purify yourself – especially if you’ve been working outside.  Immediately throw clothing in the washing machine to prevent tracking the pollen throughout your house.  You also want to shower immediately, and always wash your hair before going to bed to prevent pollen-contaminated pillows and bedding.  Next, you want to make sure your indoor-outdoor pets are wiped down and brushed before returning indoors.  Another way to limit the pollen count from entering your home is to dust and vacuum frequently.  If you have a bagless vacuum, always empty contents in a bag outside.  Another tactic is to keep the windows and doors shut.  While it can be tempting to let in fresh air, pollen also enters the home and contaminates all that fresh air you crave.  Always remember to change HEPA and HVAC filters monthly, to ensure well-maintained units and clean sinuses.  Lastly, limit your time on the porch during high pollen count times.  When the pollen is low, or pollen season is over, clean your porch furniture and hose down the floor and screens. 

 

 To review, here are our best tips for keeping pollen out of your home:

▪   Keep your car in the garage

▪   Check your shoes at the door

▪   Shower and wash clothes after outdoor activities

▪   Bathe your indoor-outdoor pets

▪   Vacuum and dust frequently

▪   Clean outdoor furniture after pollen season

 

            If pollen has already entered your home, you are not out of luck.  You can still remove the pollen from your space with a few easy housekeeping measures.  Make sure to frequently wipe down surfaces with a damp microfiber cloth to trap the particles.  Thoroughly clean all surfaces and ceiling fans, and follow with vacuuming and mopping.  Be sure to use the suction attachment to clean upholstery, and navigate the corners and crevices in your home.  You will also want to wash all bedding in warm water.  Bathe and brush pets, and clean their paws as well.  Change all air filters once per month, and use vent filters for room vents to help trap pollen in the air ducts.

 

            There are many affordable products on the market today that can help improve the air quality in your home and trap the offending pollen particles.  HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) filters are designed to prevent 99% of pollen from entering the home.  HEPA filters help to clean the indoor air and prevent allergens from circulating.  HEPA filters are used in many air filters, air purifiers, and vacuum cleaners.  When used in conjunction with a well-maintained HVAC system, HEPA filters can drastically improve the air quality of your home. Air Quality Assessors can determine allergen levels in your home and offer advice to help you get through this allergy season.  We are licensed and certified professionals, with 30 years of experience in maintaining high indoor environmental quality.  Call today to schedule an assessment of your indoor air quality, and let us help keep you and your family protected this allergy season.

 

 

Every year, millions of allergy sufferers are affected by pollen.  Pollen is a powdery yellow substance found on plants to help them reproduce.  In some cases, plants can fertilize themselves, but other plants rely on cross-pollination. As insects, birds, and the wind carry pollen between plants, some of the tiny particles inevitably drop. The pollen particles are then available to enter our nose, eyes, and throat, triggering varying allergies.  Pollen can travel hundreds of miles, so attempting to rid your yard of the offending plants will not help.  Ragweed, a common plant affecting many allergy sufferers, can produce over one million grains of pollen per day.  Fighting the allergenic pollen can seem like an insurmountable task.  Pollen is here to stay, but there are tips and tricks to help you cope. 

 

            Pollen allergies can last throughout the entire year, as several plants pollinate year-round.  The pollen count is dependent upon your location, and the duration of the season.  Pollen from trees is released during the spring, grass pollen is released during the summer, and weed pollen circulates during the fall.  Tens of millions of Americans are affected by pollen allergies every year and suffer from sneezing, nasal congestion, running nose, coughing, headaches, itchy and watery eyes, and wheezing, a lot of which can occur in your home. Indoor allergen levels can determine how impacted allergy sufferers will be indoors whether it be due to raised levels of pollen, mold, or chemicals. Pollen allergies can also exacerbate symptoms with asthma suffers indoors and outdoors.

 

            Loose pollen in the air can attach on skin, clothing, shoes, hair, and pets.  Once pollen enters your home it can cling to carpet fibers and furniture, and recirculate as you move around your home.  Attempting to keep pollen out of your home is challenging, but not impossible.  There are a few preemptive measures you can take to help make your home a no-pollen zone.  First, you want to keep your car in the garage.  If you do not have a garage, consider hosing down your car frequently.  Pollen can stick to your car, door handles, and windows, and spread easily anytime you touch the car or lower a window.  Next, check your shoes at the door.  Always wipe your feet, and then leave shoes and outerwear at the entry way or mud room.  Purify yourself – especially if you’ve been working outside.  Immediately throw clothing in the washing machine to prevent tracking the pollen throughout your house.  You also want to shower immediately, and always wash your hair before going to bed to prevent pollen-contaminated pillows and bedding.  Next, you want to make sure your indoor-outdoor pets are wiped down and brushed before returning indoors.  Another way to limit the pollen count from entering your home is to dust and vacuum frequently.  If you have a bagless vacuum, always empty contents in a bag outside.  Another tactic is to keep the windows and doors shut.  While it can be tempting to let in fresh air, pollen also enters the home and contaminates all that fresh air you crave.  Always remember to change HEPA and HVAC filters monthly, to ensure well-maintained units and clean sinuses.  Lastly, limit your time on the porch during high pollen count times.  When the pollen is low, or pollen season is over, clean your porch furniture and hose down the floor and screens. 

 

 To review, here are our best tips for keeping pollen out of your home:

  • Keep your car in the garage
  • Check your shoes at the door
  • Shower and wash clothes after outdoor activities
  • Bathe your indoor-outdoor pets
  • Vacuum and dust frequently
  • Clean outdoor furniture after pollen season

 

            If pollen has already entered your home, you are not out of luck.  You can still remove the pollen from your space with a few easy housekeeping measures.  Make sure to frequently wipe down surfaces with a damp microfiber cloth to trap the particles.  Thoroughly clean all surfaces and ceiling fans, and follow with vacuuming and mopping.  Be sure to use the suction attachment to clean upholstery, and navigate the corners and crevices in your home.  You will also want to wash all bedding in warm water.  Bathe and brush pets, and clean their paws as well.  Change all air filters once per month, and use vent filters for room vents to help trap pollen in the air ducts.

 

            There are many affordable products on the market today that can help improve the air quality in your home and trap the offending pollen particles.  HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) filters are designed to prevent 99% of pollen from entering the home.  HEPA filters help to clean the indoor air and prevent allergens from circulating.  HEPA filters are used in many air filters, air purifiers, and vacuum cleaners.  When used in conjunction with a well-maintained HVAC system, HEPA filters can drastically improve the air quality of your home. Air Quality Assessors can determine allergen levels in your home and offer advice to help you get through this allergy season.  We are licensed and certified professionals, with 30 years of experience in maintaining high indoor environmental quality.  Call today to schedule an assessment of your indoor air quality, and let us help keep you and your family protected this allergy season.

 


Indoor Air Quality- Allergens

 

Indoor Air Quality- Allergens

 

Allergens are found all over the world both inside and out! More than 50 million people in America are allergic to something. Homes or businesses that have poor indoor air quality make people more susceptible to the development of infections, lung cancer, and asthma. The most common cause for allergic reactions are from airborne allergens. Airborne allergens include: Bacteria, Mold, Dust Mites, Pet Dander, Cockroaches/bugs, Smoke, Formaldehyde, and VOCs (volatile organic compound).

DID YOU KNOW?

Facts according to WebMD about allergens

  • -Number of people in the U.S. who have either allergy or asthma symptoms : 1 in 5

  • -Rank of allergies among other leading chronic diseases in the U.S. : 5th

  • -Degree by which levels of indoor pollution in U.S. homes exceed levels of outdoor pollution: 2 to 100 times, depending on factors such as whether the residents smoke

  • -7.7% of people in the U.S. have asthma

  • -Increase in the prevalence of asthma in U.S. children under age  5 between 1980 and 1994: 160%

  • -Number of deaths each year in the U.S. from asthma: about 4,000

“Allergens.” Indoor Air Quality RSS. N.p., n.d. Web 01 July 2015

 

Common Allergy & Asthma Symptoms

Allergy: Runny nose, itchy eyes, coughing, circles around the eye, and symptoms that seem to linger/not go away. Asthma: wheezing, difficulty breathing, tightness of chest and/or a whistle sound when you breathe.

 

People spend 90% of their time indoors, which makes it very important to have good indoor air quality in your home/business. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that the average person receives 72% of their chemical exposure in the home. To know the quality of your homes air, have an Air Quality Assessor come perform an air quality assessment. The assessment will include a sampling method that will test for: mold, allergens, dust mites, pollen, cockroaches, cat, dog, bacteria and more. There are many different ways to reduce the amount of indoor allergens in your home. Some are listed below:

  • -Keep surfaces in your home clean and uncluttered to reduce dust mites

  • -Vacuum once or twice a week (vacuuming does put dust in the air so use a vacuum with a HEPA filter or special filter bags if possible)

  • -Keeping doors and windows closed will help prevent the entry of pollen

  • -Dehumidifiers help reduce the moisture in the home (moisture is a breeding ground for mold spores)

  • -Control cockroaches- don’t leave food or garbage uncovered. Use poison baits, boric acid and traps rather than chemical agents (chemical agents can increase allergic/asthmatic reactions)