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How Mold Affects Your Pets
How Mold Affects Your Pets

 

Managing a full household can be a challenge from keeping up with cleanliness, to making sure all of the errands get done, to caring for children and pets. It can be overwhelming. What makes things even more difficult, is when a problem that is not so easy to fix, arises. For example, when a window breaks. This issue must be solved in a timely manner because it can endanger children and pets living in the home. So what happens when there is a problem that is not so obvious and just won’t get solved with a band aid?

 

Building damage is frequently overlooked because it occurs on the inside of a building structure. It is basically out of sight, out of mind. But, when you begin to see signs of damage, more destruction than you expected could have already occurred. What exactly are we referring to? Mold. Mold is a hidden danger that can affect the health of everyone living around it especially pets. Pets feel the negative effects of mold exposure more than people because their immune system is smaller and more sensitive than ours.

 

Mold sickness was first discovered in animals in the 1930’s in Russia when farm animals became ill from sleeping on and eating damp hay where mold formed. These days, black mold information is readily available therefore mold is thankfully more controllable. The signs of mold sickness can be difficult to spot, especially because they are very similar to those of a cold. If your pet shows any signs of a cold or similar illness, mold should be considered a cause. Symptoms of mold exposure in pets is very similar to those of people including:

 

  • Sneezing
  • Runny nose
  • Loss of appetite
  • Skin rashes
  • Lethargy
  • Trembling  

 

 

While not an overwhelming amount of stories are in the current media about pets and mold exposure, there have been multiple reports since 2000 of situations where pets have been affected. In this particular story, two cats were living in a home where there was flood and water damage in the direct area where the cats dwelled. Although no one likes hearing sad stories with animals (we don’t like anything short of funny cat videos on the internet) this unfortunate situation helped raise awareness and probably saved many pet lives. If you have an ill pet and have had water damage in your home, it’s best to let your veterinarian know if your home has been exposed to water damage whether it’s from a flood, roof leak, or a common household leak.

 

The best action to take when you find your pet is suffering from any of the above symptoms related to mold is to relocate them. Take them somewhere where they can be comfortable and away from the effected home. Taking them to the vet is always a good precaution to take as well. The veterinarian should run routine tests to make sure the health of your pet is not declining. As petful.com states, “treatment may involve a blood transfusion (if the pet bleeds unduly) and antibiotics to fight secondary infections. Your vet will repeat blood tests to monitor liver function.” As you can see, mold and pets is very serious and for the sake of your little loved ones, should not be taken lightly.

 

What should you do if you find signs of black mold? There are many resources that can lead you in the right direction to solving your mold problem. If you are reading this blog, you probably already completed step #1 which is identifying that you have a mold problem. As indoor environmental professionals, we have multiple blog posts with advice on how to handle your mold issue. If you take away one thing from this blog, remember that mold should not be ignored, and even though you don’t see symptoms now, they can show up later. So keep you and everyone in your home safe including your pets.

 

Resources: Petful.com

     Cat Channel

                     Center for Disease Control and Prevention

                     Black Mold

                     


The Dangers of Toxic Mold Syndrome
The Dangers of Toxic Mold Syndrome

 

Toxic Mold Syndrome, also known as mold illness, is an illness that effects many people. When people get sick, they typically assume the causes are allergies, a cold, or a bad reaction to medications. When you notice a dramatic decline in your health, you have to wonder, what is the cause? Very commonly, people blame their poor health on  outdoor environments when in reality, they should be considering their indoor environments as the main culprit. Most people spend an average of 90% of their time indoors including time at work, school and at home. This fact alone should initiate further research into your indoor environments.


You may experience symptoms that are similar to colds and common allergies when dealing with Toxic Mold Syndrome including:


·         Coughing

·         Wheezing

·         Sore throat

·         Runny nose

·         Itchy eyes

·         And more…

 

There are more serious health problems related to toxic mold syndrome. In many cases, the above symptoms are just the beginning. Not only does toxic mold syndrome affect your respiratory health, but also your nervous system, circulatory system, skin, vision and mental health. As you can see, mold and any of the symptoms related to mold are all something that should not be taken lightly. It can lead to very serious health issues and even death.


In order to avoid long term health problems related to mold exposure, one would ask what is the real cause of mold growth? The simplest reason mold forms is because of moisture. There are many different forms of moisture that cause mold formation including leaks, condensation, humidity, and flooding. When moisture comes in contact with any and all kinds of organic materials (wood, carpet, clothing, etc.…) mold begins to form. There are many great mold prevention tips listed in our “How to Avoid Indoor Allergens" blog post that are easy and affordable to implement. Doing yearly inspections and taking care of your home overall will help lessen the chance of experiencing health issues related to mold.

 

There have been many case studies conducted to prove the effects of mold exposure symptoms. In this presented case study individuals that were tested ranged from 1.5 years to 52 years of age. The conclusion was conditional, however those who were involved experienced similar symptoms and reactions. Along with case studies, there are many personal stories, testimonials, and articles that present personal experiences people have had with toxic mold syndrome and mold related sicknesses. There is one story that stands out among all the rest about a woman who is now doing well, but at one point did not know what happened to her or where to turn. Kimberlyn is someone who one day, completely lost her motivation and began to become very confused as to why her personality and normal demeanor completely changed. With multiple doctor visits over 6 months, she started to find out what may be the cause of her sudden life altering ailment. If you are worried that you may be dealing with mold, her story is very relatable and could save you many unnecessary steps.


Ideally, we would like to say that mold will never be an issue in our lives, but that is not the case. Mold is everywhere. It really all depends on how quickly you handle a situation and how serious it is. Our best advice: be mindful of your surroundings and educate yourself on the signs and the steps to take to resolve your mold problem.



Recommended Links: Black Mold

                                       AMEN clinics

       US National Library of Medicine National Institute of Health

                                       Centers for Disease Control and Prevention