Air Quality Assessors Blog

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Air Quality Assessors Blog


At Risk Areas of Your Home
At Risk Areas of Your Home

Not all rooms in your home are created equal! This is definitely true when it comes to areas of the home that are highly impacted by excess moisture, leaks, and mold. So, how do you know which rooms to keep an eye on and what extra precautions to take to make sure your home is free from excess moisture? We've provided you with some helpful tips to ensure that every square inch of your home is as dry and clean as possible for you to live your healthiest life.

 

Rooms At High Risk

So, which rooms of your house are at the highest risk for moisture and mold growth? Any room that is consistently exposed to moisture is higher at risk for mold exposure. This is because those are the conditions that mold thrives in. So, as you can imagine, rooms like the bathroom and basement have the highest risk for excess humidity and mold growth. Bathrooms are especially prone to mold due to the amount of plumbing present and how much humidity occurs daily with bathing. But, mold can grow in any room where there is excess moisture in the form of a household leak, high humidity from the climate, improper ventilation or improper insulation within the home. Mold can even grow on your mattress over time if you tend to excessively sweat at night!


Signs To Look Out For

If you're worried about mold sneaking up on you, there are signs to look out for. You should be especially vigilant if you know that there is excess moisture recently within the home. If you happen to notice visible spots on the surfaces of your home which could be fuzzy or flat, that's a sign that there is mold growing. Mold often has a distinguishable musty and earthy odor, which is another thing to look out for. Finally, listen to your body! Mold impacts the air quality by saturating it with spores that contain mycotoxins. If you're displaying unexplained allergy symptoms such as respiratory irritation, headaches, or dizziness, you could be exposing yourself to mold within the home.


Steps To Take

If you notice excess moisture in any of the rooms in your home, there are steps you can take to solve the problem. Make sure rooms are ventilated properly, use a dehumidifier where needed, and check for excess moisture where plumbing is present. You can also take advantage of products like mold resistant paint for areas such as the basement and bathroom. It's also a good idea to get your HVAC systems maintained to ensure they're working. A professional mold remediation company can help you if you're looking to make sure the room is completely free of moisture, or if you need a mold problem remediated. Professionals have years of experience and first-hand knowledge on how to remedy excess moisture and mold within the home. With these tools at your disposal, you're well on your way to having a perfectly balanced and healthy home that's free from excess moisture.

When Humidity Rears Its Ugly Head
When Humidity Rears Its Ugly Head


What is Humidity? 

Humidity is described as the amount of water vapor or water molecules that are currently present in the air. So, what causes humidity in the air to begin with? It can all be traced back to the water cycle and wind patterns on the planet. When it rains and water reaches the ground, it evaporates back into the atmosphere when it reaches a certain temperature. When you hear meteorologists talking about humidity, they are referring to "relative humidity". What does that mean? This term simply compares the current amount of moisture in the air to the total amount of moisture that the air can hold.


Where Humidity is Most Common

Warm air can hold more water than cold air, which is why you experience those unbearably hot and humid days during the summer months. So, it's safe to say that you can usually expect higher levels of humidity in warm climates, especially if they are by a large body of water or experience a lot of rainfall. Humidity is often pushed up from wind currents originating from humid places around the world. This is exactly what causes changes in weather.


Indoor Humidity 

Humidity outside is one thing to deal with, and humidity indoors is another. The level of humidity in your home can impact the concentration of indoor air pollutants, which relates to the overall air quality. Having excess moisture in your house creates the perfect conditions for mold and mildew to form. Mold in the home can cause a variety of health disturbances, and it can affect the structural integrity of your home if it goes unchecked. Headaches, dizziness, respiratory issues, and asthma symptoms are some of the health dangers that mold in the household can bring. Mold caused by high humidity levels can wreak havoc on your health, emotional state, and bank account if you have to resort to remediation! This is why it is important to control the level of humidity in your home, especially in unfavorable weather conditions.


Controlling Humidity in the Home

You might be wondering, "How do I keep the humidity of my house in check in a climate like Florida?", and we're here to give you some tips. It is recommended to consistently use a dehumidifier in your house if you are experiencing excess humidity indoors, even in the cool winter months. Depending on the weather, you may need to adjust the dehumidifier when it does cool down a bit. You can also get a hygrometer, which is a small tool that measures the relative humidity level in a room. You generally want the relative humidity level to be between 35 and 45 percent, depending on your household. When using a dehumidifier, you'll want to be certain you're replacing the filters and cleaning it as needed. If you're using a dehumidifier with a dirty filter, mold and bacteria can grow quite easily, and those spores will go right into the air.